Jains Get Along With Other Religions

Those who observe the practices of Jainism often praise its followers for their boundless pacifist attitudes. They do not believe in harming other living creatures, no matter how small or seemingly insignificant. Perhaps that is why it should come as little surprise that Jains get along with those who follow far different religious practices. But they spend a lot of their time making good with those who are most similar, as well. 

Sikhism is another religion with a minority population of followers in India. It is also one of the youngest in the world. Still, Jains and Sikhs are often seen working together when practicing religious rituals or observing holidays important to their religions.

But more notably, the two religions have always accepted one another. Neither has ever sought to harm the other. None of the followers of either religion have fought. Jains and Sikhs cooperate on more profound levels than members of other religions.

For example, Punjabi colleges that are Sikh-owned will often accept Jain students and vice versa. When traveling afar, members of one religion will often seek members of the other religion out for hospitality.

Why are the two religions such a good match for one another?

Simple: the core practices of one perfectly complement the other. Jains have a strict principle of ahimsa, or nonviolence. It is the reason Jains are so peaceful. Sikhs have a strict principle of seva, or service. They regularly tend to those who are in greatest need. For at least five centuries, Sikhs have also provided free langars — or community kitchen — all over the world. 

For the most part, Jain and Sikh followers believe in equal rights and frown upon the more traditional caste systems of other religions. In an era of intolerance, terrorism, murder, corruption, and where foreign bribes are running rampant at their home in India, Jains and Sikhs serve as beacons of light for those who need their help the most. Sometimes, of course, they focus on serving one another as part of their daily routines and ritual practices.

Sadly, sometimes westerners subject them to hate crimes based in large part on ignorance and misunderstanding.

It does not help that academics have not poured the same focus into studying either religion as they have in studying larger ones, like Christianity or Islam. Until they do, it is likely that Jains and Sikhs will continue to be targeted because of this lack of awareness by others. A new book will be published to shed light on Jainism and Sikhism as they relate to one another. Perhaps this book is the first step in the right direction.

Watch the video below to learn more about Sikhism!